Frequently Asked Questions

What is the first step to becoming a foster/adoptive parent?

The first step would be to attend an orientation, which will answer many of your questions.  Please view the orientation schedule to find a time and location near you.

What are the requirements to foster/adopt through Arizona Faith and Families?

Applicants must be at least 21 years old to begin the process.  Over the course of the process, applicants will be required to obtain a physician statement, provide 5 personal references, pass criminal background checks, obtain CPR/first aid certification, complete home study interviews, pass a home inspection, and complete state required training.  Please visit our article on the steps to becoming a licensed foster parent to find out more.

You should also review our mission and beliefs to ensure that Arizona Faith and Families will be a good fit for your needs.  Applicants are expected to confess Jesus Christ as their Savior and Lord, agree with the Apostles’ Creed, and adhere to the biblical view of marriage.

Why should I become a foster or adoptive parent?

As of early 2016, there are over 20,000 children in the Arizona foster care system, many living in group homes waiting for placement with families.  The Christian church has a responsibility to rise up and care for these children.  By taking in a child, you are provided with a unique opportunity to provide a safe environment for them to grow, while sharing and exemplifying the gospel on a daily basis.

We recognize that not every Christian is physically capable or in a position to take in a child, but if you are interested in receiving more information, feel free to contact us.

What changes will I need to make to my home to become licensed?

There are basic safety requirements that need to be met to become a licensed foster parent.  These can include the purchase of a fire extinguisher, locking medication and toxins, and ensuring pool safety.  To view a more detailed list please visit our article on home inspections.

What qualities make for a good foster/adoptive parent?

There is no “cookie cutter” template that all parents must follow.  In the same way that there are a wide range of personalities and traits that make for good biological parents, good foster/adoptive parents come in a variety of personalities and traits as well.

Parents that are in the best position to succeed are those who have saving faith in Jesus Christ, are living in obedience to His Word, and manifest the fruit of the Spirit (Gal 5:22-24).

What are the challenges of being a foster parent?

While every foster child is different, many have behavioral issues and many are delayed in schooling due to their previous home environment.  It can be frustrating at times while you and the child get to know each other and become acclimated.  You can expect your patience to be regularly tested.

It can also be disheartening to say goodbye to a foster child that you have grown to love.  Most foster children are placed for a period of 9-12 months, which is more than enough time to develop strong bonds.

Having strong friendships and a good support base are vital to facing these challenges head on.

I don't immunize my children, can I still become a foster parent?

Yes, with some provisions.  State policy prohibits placement of a child under the age of six in a home where children are not immunized.  This is a health protection to both your children and the children in care.

How long does the certification and training process take?

The process is typically completed within a period of 4-6 months.

Are there any fees to become a foster or adoptive parent?

You will not need to pay anything to Arizona Faith and Families for certification or training.  However, your home will need to be prepared for children at your own expense.  Obtaining a physician statement and CPR/first aid certification may result in a minor expense as well.

Are there any provisions for regular day care or temporary child care?

Day care financial assistance may be available through a state approved day care.  There may be a co-pay or initial admission fee which would be the responsibility of the foster parent.

If child care is required for a certain reason, foster families have 6 days of respite care available.  Respite care pays another certified family to care for your foster child during the time needed.

Will I be paid to be a foster or adoptive parent?

Foster care and adoption does provide some financial reimbursement for the additional expenses of taking in a child.  The rate varies based on the age and needs of the child, but it is typically around $20 per day per child.

Taking in a child is not an option at this time. Is there any other way I can help?

Absolutely!  First and foremost, we would appreciate your prayers for current foster parents, foster parents currently in training, the children that are currently placed with a family or waiting for placement, and for our agency.  Please click here to find out more.